Summer 2018

MPA Courses

PUBPOL 555: Grant Writing

Instructor: Kristina Mayer
Meets: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:10-12:20 pm; A-term, June 19-July 17
Description: This community-based learning course offers students an opportunity to work with community partners to craft real-time grant proposals. The course is an introduction to grantwriting concepts, strategies, tools, and grantee/grantor relationships. This is an active, fast-paced, and engaging course. Students will do individual and group work in collaboration with community partners and will be expected to make a site visit off campus early in the course. Methods include discussion/lecture, reading/writing, activities in and out of the classroom, and online discussion. Each student and writing team will get personalized feedback from the instructor. Some proficiency in writing and budgeting or financial skills are beneficial but not required. This course can be credited toward the Evans School MPA Nonprofit Management Program and Certificate.

PUBPOL 583: Science, Technology, and Public Policy

Instructor: Howard McCurdy
Meets: Mondays and Wednesdays, 5:30-8:20 pm; A-term, June 18-July 18
Description: From the spaceship to the computer chip, public officials work hard to promote innovation through science and technology. In turn, discoveries arising from science and technology invite governmental response. This course examines the manner in which science and technology affects public policy. Topics include the debate over how much government support is necessary to spur research and innovation, the manner in which scientific issues make their way onto the policy agenda, the players in science policy, the clash between science and political ideology, the role of government as a regulator of technology, the manner in which technology reshapes governmental organization, and the governance challenges arising from 21st century technologies. Students additionally examine impending technologies, the relationship between popular culture and technology, and specific policy issues of interest to students in the class. 

Professor McCurdy is the author of eight books on science policy, innovation, and space exploration, a professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University in Washington, D.C., and an adjunct professor at the University of Washington. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degree from the University of Washington and his doctorate from Cornell University.

1-Credit Skills Workshops

PUBPOL 598 A: Fundraising Fundamentals

Instructor: Dawn Rains
Meets: Mondays, 5:50-8:30 pm; A-term, June 18-July 9
Description: Nonprofit organizations rely on charitable contributions from individuals, corporations, and foundations to fuel their important missions. This skills workshop provides an overview of the role of philanthropy in the community and within an organization and the basic principles underpinning fund development. We will explore the elements of a strategic fundraising plan and the strategies, tools, and techniques used to move potential supporters from interest and information to involvement and investment. Learn how to create a compelling case for support, write effective donor-centered communications, solicit gifts, and measure fundraising effectiveness. Students are encouraged to select a nonprofit organization in advance of the first class to use as their focus during class exercises and assignments.

PUBPOL 598 B: Citizen Behavior Change: The Social Marketing Approach

Instructor: Nancy Lee
Meets: Wednesdays, 10:20-1:00 pm; A-term, June 20, 27, July 11, 18
Description: CStudents with degrees in Public Administration often find themselves in jobs that involve responsibilities to influence citizen behaviors. These efforts traditionally rely on one of two options: Information or Laws. This workshop introduces a third option, Social Marketing, one that most often results in the highest return on investment of resources. This proven strategy has been used to improve public health (e.g., increase physical activity); reduce injuries (e.g., senior fall prevention); protect the environment (e.g., foodwaste composting); and engage communities (e.g., increasing informed voting). Students will learn what distinguishes the social marketing approach, when it is the best option, and become familiar with a 10 Step Planning model for developing a successful social marketing campaign. Behavior change theories, including ones such as Behavioral Economics, and tactics, such as using social media, will be discussed, as well as the importance of, and techniques for, audience research.

PUBPOL 598 C: The Role of the Military in International Development and Humanitarian Crisis Response

Instructor: Jason Smith
Meets: Wednesdays, 5:20-8:00 pm; B-term, July 25-August 15
Description: This workshop is intended to help students understand the capabilities that the United States military can bring to the world of international development and humanitarian crisis response. Development work in today’s world is very complex. Whether you work for an NGO, IGO, OGO, or a private company, you could potentially be in a situation where you could require military support or benefit from the resources the military can offer. With the U.S. led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, along with the recent standing up of Africa Command, the United States military has found itself more involved in work that is outside its primary mission. Good or bad, this has become reality.

This course will focus on the following topics: U.S. military doctrine and ability to task organize for specific missions; specialized units and logistics capability; permissive versus non-permissive environments; and, military limitations and challenges. In addition to these topics, this workshop will look at the different Combatant Commands (COCOMS) and explore some of the unique challenges and possible opportunities that exist.

Spring 2018

Undergraduate Courses

Click here for our undergraduate course offerings.

MPA Courses

PUBPOL 504: Leadership Ethics in the Public Interest

Instructor: Ines Jurcevic
Meets: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:30-9:50 am
Description: Bad people do bad things and good people do good things, right? Good and bad according to whom? This class takes a nuanced approach to examining the many predictors that influence ethical leadership. In particular, this course focuses on the ways in which leaders must recognize and respond to a variety of competing value propositions both within and outside their institution. We’ll explore critical questions such as: How are values and ethics established within and by individuals? What responsibility does a leader have for shaping the ethical climate in the organization? We will approach these questions from a variety of perspectives, examining psychological, organizational, and cultural processes. This class does not aim to provide the right/wrong answer to ethical leadership dilemmas. Rather, it aims to help you better understand the ways in which you are already making ethical decisions and to promote reflection and dialogue in order to challenge and help you think about ethical leadership in deeper, more complex ways. This course meets the Evans School MPA Values Elective Requirement.

PUBPOL 555 A: Social Enterprise: New Models for Mission-Based Business

Instructor: Akhtar Badshah
Meets: Mondays, 2:30-5:20 pm
Description: This seminar course offers students a deep understanding of the changing landscape for social investments and the tools to become an effective social entrepreneur or practitioner working in the social enterprise and mission-based business space. A social enterprise is an organization that applies commercial strategies to maximize improvements in human and environmental well-being—this may include maximizing social impact alongside profits for external shareholders. This class will focus on the Social Enterprise and Social Business and through lectures, discussion, and practical projects and engage students to explore concepts such as: Ethics of Development, New Funding Models and Investor Expectations, Innovation and Scalability, and Importance of Policy. This course can be credited toward the Evans School MPA Nonprofit Management Program and Certificate.

PUBPOL 555 B: Funding the Social Sector

Instructor: Kristina Mayer
Meets: Mondays, 8:30-11:20 am
Description: This course will offer students an understanding and tools to strategically manage the revenue side of nonprofits. The course will be organized around two questions: How (and why) is the nonprofit sector funded? And, as a nonprofit leader, what are all the ways your organization can reliably fund its mission-related activity? Through case study discussions, lectures, and projects, this course will engage students in exploring funding models and how to operationalize them and will take a deep look at sources of nonprofit revenue from individual giving to earned income and investments. This course will require students to critically analyze and creatively link across disciplines to bring to bear the most promising practices to advance the social sector. This course can be credited toward the Evans School MPA Nonprofit Management Program and Certificate.

PUBPOL 587: Native Nations, Native Lands, Native Waters

Instructor: Laura Evans
Meets: Tuesdays, 2:30-5:20 pm
Description: There are over 560 Native Nations in the United States, including 29 federally recognized tribes in Washington. Native Nations are long-standing, legally-recognized sovereign powers with land bases that they govern. They shape the lives of some of the most vulnerable American citizens and affect the interests of nearby local and state governments. This class will review how tribal governments work and how they interact with other governments in the United States. It will consider their legal status as self-governing sovereigns and the realpolitik of on-the-ground power.

If you care how environmental protection plays out in any of the 34 states with federally-recognized tribal governments, you should be paying attention to what Native Nations are doing. If you think you understand public management, program design, and program implementation in the US, this class has surprises in store for you. The successes of some tribal casinos have lured many outside observers into thinking that gambling revenue alone can somehow mend the devastation of culture, community, natural resources, and sacred spaces. The reality is quite different. This course will sort out the stereotypes from the truths of America's Native Nations today. This course can be credited toward the Evans School MPA Environmental Policy Program.

PUBPOL 597: Role of Scientific Information in Environmental Decisions

Instructor: Alison Cullen
Meets: Tuesdays, 11:30-2:20 pm
Description: This course examines how science contributes to decisions that involve the natural environment: how science and scientists help frame debates and decisions; how scientific findings are incorporated into decision-making processes; and how scientists and non-scientists deal with uncertainty about scientific questions. The course illustrates the need for accurate representation and critical evaluation of scientific information. This course can be credited toward the Evans School MPA Environmental Policy Program.

1-Credit Skills Workshops

PUBPOL 598 A: Career Planning for MPA Students

Instructor: Shannon Merchant
Meets: Wednesdays, 12:30-2:20 pm; April 4, April 18, May 2, May 16, May 30
Description: Confident in your interview skills? Ready to negotiate your first job offer? Able to articulate your professional interests, strengths and values? You will be after taking this class! Intentional career planning helps MPA students successfully transition into the job market after graduation and advance into future leadership roles. This skills workshop will help students understand their talents and skills, build confidence in students’ ability to articulate their value to future employers, and challenge students to master important career management concepts (such as crafting exceptional career documents, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and building relationships with leaders in their fields of interest). A feature of this class will be connecting in-person with successful Evans School alumni through informational interviews, career panels, and networking events. Students are encouraged to identify a job or organization of interest in advance of the first class to use as their focus during class exercises and assignments; this class is tailored to MPA students who will be actively seeking full-time employment within the next six months.

PUBPOL 598 B: Introduction to Tableau and Data Visualization

Instructor: Adam Sherman
Meets: Thursdays, 1:30-3:20 pm; April 5, April 19, May 3, May 17, May 31
Description: This workshop will introduce students to Tableau software and data visualization basics. The focus will be on data visualization best practices and learning how to use Tableau to build dynamic, interactive, and impactful dashboards to help you explore data trends, discover patterns, and inform policy decisions. This course will teach students how to connect their data sources to Tableau, develop basic and intermediate level charts and dashboards, map geographic elements of data sets, and present results of survey data. The workshop will also cover important ethical implications of data visualization choices.

PUBPOL 598 C: Making Collaborative Governance Work

Instructor: Michael Kern
Meets: Tuesdays, 5:30-7:50 pm; April 3, April 17, May 1, May 15, May 22
Description: The purpose of this five-part workshop is to: 1) explore what we mean by the term “collaborative governance;” 2) examine several case studies in some depth; and 3) apply what we learn to a range of public policy situations/challenges that are of interest to workshop participants. We will spend much of the time in discussion, with just enough theory to inform us and get us rolling. We will dive into the details of some real-world applications of this inexact and sometimes messy concept, to see what we can learn. We will explore both the significant achievements reflected in these case studies, and also where each fell short, because no collaborative process (or any other policy process, for that matter) is successful in all ways. Participants will come out of the workshop able to distinguish a collaborative governance process from other forms of collaboration, cooperation, and partnership; and an understanding of the circumstances under which a collaborative governance process is likely to be successful.

PUBPOL 598 D: Nonprofit Marketing

Instructor: Erica Mills
Meets: Wednesdays, 2:30-5:20 pm; March 28, April 11, April 25, May 9
Description: As nonprofits are increasingly being asked to do more with less, being able to effectively market your mission is more important than ever. In this interactive workshop, students will find out how to grab people's attention and keep them engaged. Students will learn a method created specifically for marketing mission-driven organizations, and then apply that method to develop a marketing plan for a nonprofit organization. Packed with real-world examples, this workshop will be practical and timely.

Special Topics

PUBPOL 599 A: Advanced Program Evaluation

Instructor: Carlos Cuevas
Meets: Tuesdays, 2:30-5:20 pm
Description: This course aims at familiarizing students with advanced topics in program design and evaluation, as well as preparing them to address performance monitoring and evaluation of programs they find already in progress when they enter professional practice. Students will have taken PUBPOL 526 Program Evaluation, and ideally advanced multivariate analysis. The course relies heavily on case analyses of program design and evaluations in international development organizations, and governments (federal, state, local, both USA and foreign). This course can be credited toward the Evans School MPA International Development Program and Certificate.

PUBPOL 599 C: Managing Public Grants and Contracts

Instructor: Ben Brunjes
Meets: Mondays, 5:30-8:20 pm
Description: Public organizations are increasingly reliant on partners and contractors for the delivery of public services. Governments use a variety of means to engage these partners, including grants and contracts. This course will explore how public officials can best design, manage, and evaluate contracts and grants to improve performance. Design elements include market assessments, solicitation procedures, financial structures, and the development of performance measures. Students will learn about the process through which contracts and grants are managed, economic and political perspectives on how to manage and oversee contractors and grantees, and how to effectively evaluate performance to inform future partnerships. Students will be given the chance to write, respond to, and develop performance criteria for both grants and contracts. In addition, the class will delve into the ramifications of this complex system of partnerships for budgets and American democratic values. At its completion, students will understand the challenges associated with contracting and grants, and know some of the leading strategies for managing these tools in practice.

PUBPOL 599 D: Values and Biases in Public Policy

Instructor: Ines Jurcevic
Meets: Thursdays, 5:30-8:20 pm
Description: Why are we all so divided? Can’t we just get along? Recent decades have seen a marked increase in political polarization and we seem divided on virtually every policy issue, even when facing the same facts. In this course, we will take a social psychological meets public policy perspective to illuminate what Americans think about topics of political importance, how those opinions are formed, and the ways that individuals transmit their ideas to shape public policy. Broadly, we will examine readings, controversies, and theories of the behavior of non-elite political actors and how these are shaped and guided by cognitive biases, emotions, and ideological motivations. This deeper understanding will allow you to better think like a researcher and gain a deeper understanding of causes and influences on political behavior. This course meets the Evans School MPA Values Elective Requirement.

PhD Courses

PPM 599 A: Research Seminar (1-credit course)

Instructor: Ben Brunjes
Meets: Wednesdays, 12:00-1:20 pm
Description: Students who sign up for PPM 599 will attend research seminars presented by Evans School faculty and policy and management scholars from other UW departments, as well as other Universities. Students will learn about new theories and empirical findings on a wide range of topics in public policy and management and be more fully immersed in a research environment. To receive credit, a student must attend a minimum number of seminars (TBD), including the question and answer period. 

PPM 599 B: Discrete Choice Analysis (4-credit course)

Instructor: David Layton
Meets: Tuesdays, 2:30-5:20 pm
Description: This course focuses on the statistical modeling of choices made by agents (individuals, households, groups, firms, and other entities). The discrete choices might take the form of answering yes/no questions, voting, choosing one house, trip, or commute route out of many, and other related problems such as evaluative ratings or rankings. These choices might be one-time decisions or repeated through time. It also relates to more general models where a continuous dependent variable is not observed over its entire range for some reason (e.g., Tobit models). Innovations in computational and econometric methods have led to even wider application of ever more realistic but more complicated discrete choice models. The goals of this course are applied in that the focus is on working with data, estimating models, and in conducting empirical economic analysis. Specifically, the goals include: learning (or practicing) to write estimation programs; to implement and then analyze the results of simulation estimators for high dimensional discrete choice problems; and to conduct applied analysis of welfare measures and other quantities in the context of choice models. While the models considered here are discrete choice, extensive practice in estimation, testing, and analysis builds important skills readily transferable to other classes of statistical problems. The prerequisite is graduate level statistics/econometrics at the level of SOC 505/506 or ECON 581/582 or similar. Concurrent enrollment in SOC 506 or ECON 582 is possible (please discuss with the instructor). Graduate students from all disciplines welcome.

Winter 2018

MPA Courses

PUBPOL 555: Grant Writing

Instructor: Kristina Mayer
Meets: Wednesdays, 9:00-11:50 am
Description: Sustainable nonprofit funding models have a variety of income streams. Grants are often a part of that diverse mix of funding that allows a nonprofit to carry out its mission locally, regionally, or around the globe. This course is designed as a community-based learning experience. There will be active engagement with a nonprofit while learning the facets of grantwriting from crafting a fundable concept to developing a budget that reflects a story of the work you propose and preparing for submission. You will be exposed to key concepts, strategies, and tools applicable across a variety of grant seeking settings. This course can be credited toward the Evans School MPA Nonprofit Management Program and Certificate.

PUBPOL 565 A: Local Government Management

Instructor: Dick Zais, Anne Pflug
Meets: Mondays and Wednesdays, 4:30-5:50 pm
Description: This course is for students who are interested in exploring the field of local government management. With the most jobs in the public sector, local government management touches people’s lives in real ways every day. Learn about the soft and hard skills local government managers use and how Evans School core course material is applied in local government. Over ten professionals in the field present course materials using case studies, real world examples, mock budget, and labor arbitration hearings. Opportunities to connect with career networking and internships are provided.

PUBPOL 565 B: GIS and Public Policy

Instructor: Mahesh Somashaker
Meets: Mondays, 11:30-2:20 pm
Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to Geographic Information Science (GIS) and its application to public policy. Maps are a powerful tool for both describing and studying public policy issues that occur across space. Lectures will discuss the building blocks of effectively creating, analyzing, and presenting maps in policy settings, while lab work and assignments will introduce students to GIS software. Topics include, but are not limited to, understanding how maps can be used; creating and manipulating maps; working with spatial data sources; and conducting spatial analysis. Examples will come from a wide variety of policy settings, such as housing, public health, transportation, and the environment.

PUBPOL 573: Policy and Governance of K-12 Education

Instructor: Bill Zumeta
Meets: Tuesdays, 4:30-7:20 pm
Description: This MPA elective (also open to PhD and non-Evans students) will touch on a range of topics in contemporary education policy while providing students an opportunity to apply and extend their knowledge and skills in economics, statistics, policy analysis, evaluation, and management analysis. We will explore why education tends to be publicly provided and also the reasons behind instances where it is not so or where elements of privatization are integrated into public provision—such as public school choice, charter schools, contract schools, and voucher arrangements. We will also look at American federalism in the context of education—the limited but periodically waxing and waning role of the federal government (e.g., in areas like standards and testing such as the Common Core, desegregation policy, and federal efforts to make education policy more evidence based), as well as the role of the states, and of the 15,000 or so local school districts with elected boards embodying “local control” of American public education. How did the U.S. education system come to be governed this way and what consequences does it have? What are the implications of significant changes that have been afoot in recent decades in the locus of governance as well as pushback against them? We will also give some attention to the organizational and governance structures of early childhood and postsecondary education, which tend to be quite separate (a problem in itself).

We will study in depth the arrangements for education funding in the U.S. and the consequences these have for equity as well as the current ferment and challenges around policy remedies (e.g., the McCleary Supreme Court case in Washington). We will also study policies related to the most crucial resource related to student achievement: teachers, including their recruitment and training, their effectiveness and evaluation, and related labor market issues. Another topic will be the P-20 education continuum (pre-school to graduate school), which turns out to be a fragile ladder for many because of the way our educational system is structured. What policy remedies are available or have been tried to make the system more seamless for students? Finally, we will take a look at “horizontal” links–or the lack of same–with related social sectors (health, social services, criminal justice) whose stronger links to education could certainly improve performance on both sides. We will touch on why these links are generally weak in the U.S. as well as how these challenges might be overcome.

PUBPOL 595: Environmental Governance in the Developing World

Instructor: Kate Crosman
Meets: Wednesdays, 11:30-2:30 pm
Description: The primary purpose of this class is twofold: 1) to introduce students to the array of mechanisms and tools commonly applied to environmental governance in the developing world, and 2) to empower students to think critically about the use and application of those mechanisms and tools in different contexts and to different ends. In order to understand how these mechanisms and tools operate in practice, we will also unpack the actors and institutional structures that influence and underpin environmental governance in developing countries.

1-Credit Skills Workshops

PUBPOL 598 B: Data Processing and Visualization Design in R

Instructor: Graham Bearden
Meets: Wednesdays, January 10 through February 7, 6:00-8:50 pm
Description: This workshop teaches the fundamental skills required to prepare, analyze, and report data in R. Production of data visualizations and tables will be central to materials on reporting. This is an introductory course that will avail R functionality in a way that is accessible to new R programmers. This is an applied course that focuses on successful execution of code. While students should consider theory, style, and efficiency of R programming, getting the job done right will be the first priority of the workshop. Students are required to bring a laptop to the workshop.

PUBPOL 598 C: Career Planning for MPA Students

Instructor: Tamara Schaps, Shannon Merchant
Meets: Thursdays, January 11, 25, February 8, 22, and March 8, 1:30-3:20 pm
Description: Confident in your interview skills? Ready to negotiate your first job offer? Able to articulate your top talents and skills? You will be after taking this class! Intentional career planning helps MPA students successfully transition into the job market after graduation and advance into future leadership roles. This skills workshop will help students understand their talents and skills, build confidence in students ability to articulate their value, and challenge students to master important career management concepts (such as crafting exceptional career documents, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and building relationships with leaders in their fields of interest). A feature of this class will be connecting in-person with successful Evans School alumni through informational interviews, career panels, and networking events. Students are encouraged to identify a job or organization of interest in advance of the first class to use as their focus during class exercises and assignments; this class is tailored to MPA students who will be actively seeking full-time employment within the next six months.

Special Topics

PUBPOL 599 B: Computation Thinking for Governance Analytics

Instructor: Jose Magallanes
Meets: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30-9:50 am
Description: This course is an innovative combination of Data Science and Computational Social Science particularly structured for policy studies. It gives participants a practical way to analyze governance by means of analytics of different data structures, including tables, networks and maps. It also connects analytics to optimization techniques and recent developments in policy simulation. Real government data is used throughout the course. The participants will also develop good practices in reproducibility for professional work in policy research. Every session of the course follows and hands-on approach (bring your laptop). Tools to be taught and used include programming languages (Python/R/Netlogo), version control apps (GitHub), document preparation tools (markdown/latex), and advanced excel functionalities. There is no pre-requisite for the course.

PUBPOL 599 D: Advanced Policy Analysis

Instructor: Grant Blume
Meets: Tuesdays, 1:00-3:50 pm
Description: This course expands on the topics that you may have encountered as part of the baseline policy analysis skill set you developed in PUBPOL 513. In PUBPOL 599 we will explore policy analysis from a vantage point where one particular criteria, such as equity or justice, is the centerpiece of the analysis. Using a more focused lens to analyze public policy like this may bring up such questions as "How does the definition of a policy problem change when we acknowledge the policy problem exists within a system of structural sexism?" and "What are the implications for policy analysis when we incorporate justice as one of our criteria?" To grapple with these questions and frame our analysis we will draw from history, sociology, political science, and a range of other disciplines to complement the conventional policy analysis literature.

PhD Courses

PPM 599: Research Seminar

Meets: Wednesdays, 12:00-1:20 pm
Description: Students who sign up for PPM 599 will attend research seminars presented by Evans School faculty and policy and management scholars from other UW departments, as well as other Universities. Students will learn about new theories and empirical findings on a wide range of topics in public policy and management and be more fully immersed in a research environment. To receive credit, a student must attend a minimum number of seminars (TBD), including the question and answer period.  

Autumn 2017

PPM 599: Research Seminar
Meets: Wednesdays, 12:00-1:20 pm
Description: Students who sign up for PPM 599 will attend research seminars presented by Evans School faculty and policy and management scholars from other UW departments, as well as other Universities. Students will learn about new theories and empirical findings on a wide range of topics in public policy and management and be more fully immersed in a research environment. To receive credit, a student must attend a minimum number of seminars (TBD), including the question and answer period. 

PUBPOL 510: Foundations of American Democracy
Instructor: Laura Evans
Meets: Tuesdays, 2:00-4:50 pm
Description: Examines core values about liberty, equality, justice, and American identity that shape American political culture and institutions. Examines key changes in political institutions, along with social and economic conditions, that have shaped the course of the republic. Gives special consideration to consequences for civil rights, checks and balances, bureaucratic power, political cleavages, and state-society relations.

PUBPOL 514: Psychology for Policy Analysis
Instructor: Grant Blume
Meets: Tuesdays, 2:00-4:50 pm
Description: Why are employer-sponsored retirement plans underutilized? What circumstances affect the choices that people make about eating healthy foods? Why does a small change to an application cause a big increase in the take-up of a public program? These questions related to an overarching question that is relevant across all policy domains: What can we learn from the intersection of public policy and psychology? In PUBPOL 514 we will develop an understanding of emerging behavioral research, apply these concepts to policy problems large and small, and consider the important implications that behavioral research has for public policy in a democratic society.

PUBPOL 537 A: Development Practice: Financial Inclusion and Poverty Reduction
Instructor: Carlos Cuevas
Meets: Wednesdays, 5:00-7:50 pm
Description: “Applied development economics” or “development practice” could be defined as the use of development economics theory, empirical evidence and other lessons from development interventions to improve upon those interventions in terms of the degree to which their goals are achieved. From the multiple possible “development goals” we choose poverty reduction as the focus of this course, and take a critical look at the development experience fighting poverty over the last decade. The course aims at providing a solid analytical base for students to conduct and/or evaluate development interventions, especially those using financial services as intended poverty reduction tools. 

PUBPOL 595 B: Environmental Risks and Values
Instructor: Alison Cullen
Meets: Thursdays, 2:00-4:50 pm
Description: Explores a range of sources of risk to human health and the environment, and the values that color communication, perception, and decision making about risk. This topic lies at the core of an ongoing conversation between communities, governments, social scientists, natural scientists, industry representatives, environmental NGOs, and the media. These groups strive to answer difficult questions such as “what is safe?” “what is acceptable?” “what is known?” “who/what do we prioritize?” “who decides the optimal balance of risk and opportunity?” Topics will include energy, climate, water supply, emerging technology, environmental justice, and others.

PUBPOL 598 A: The Art and Science of Effective Public Speaking
Instructor: Grant Blume
Meets: Wednesdays, 2:00-3:20 pm; October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 29
Description: The objective of this skills workshop is to equip you with a toolkit of public speaking skills that will serve you across whatever professional endeavors you pursue upon earning your MPA. Grounded in the science of what makes speakers effective, we will diagnose your existing strengths and weaknesses and spend the quarter improving and refining your public speaking skills.

PUBPOL 598 B: Legislative Skills
Instructor: State Rep. Gerry Pollet
Meets: Tuesdays, 5:30-7:20; October 4-31
Description: By the end of the quarter, you will have developed a small portfolio of legislative products to show any future employer or to use as a citizen lobbyist. Using a variation of Problem Based Learning with guest speakers and interactive strategies learn how to develop and analyze legislation at local, state, or federal levels. The course will use current “hot” legislative topics to examine development of legislative strategies, and the roles of research, staff, and lobbyists in legislative “deliberations.” You will gain hands-on experience with drafting bills and budget analyses, developing strategies and advocacy materials. At the end of the quarter, you will have a small portfolio which may include professional bill analysis, budget provisos, policy or advocacy memos, and other materials.

PUBPOL 599 A: Campaign Management and Political Communications
Instructor: Chris Vance
Meets: Thursdays, 11:30-2:20 pm
Description: In a democracy, election results drive public policy. The next campaign is never far from the minds of elected officials. Policy is often made via ballot measures, or driven by advocacy campaigns. Therefore, anyone who’s career involves public affairs needs to understand how political campaigns really operate. In addition, political campaign management, consulting, and political communications are very viable public affairs career paths. Some make campaigns a career; while many others use campaign jobs as stepping stones to other positions. Office holders and organizations are always in need of press secretaries or other top staff who have the ability to think strategically and communicate a message. This course is designed to give participants the same level of training political organizations and parties provide to candidates and entry level campaign managers and staff, and to train students in the basics of press relations, and strategic communications. The goal is that upon completion of the course, students will not only understand how campaigns function, they will actually be prepared to work on a campaign staff or in a political office or advocacy organization.

PUBPOL 599 B: Crime and Punishment Policy
Instructor: Karin Martin
Meets: Tuesdays, 10:00-12:50 pm
Description: This course examines how the confluence of politics, culture, ideology, and empirics generates policy related to crime and punishment. The course draws on examples from policing, courts, prison, and community supervision to explore the (often contested) realities of policy-making in criminal justice. In order to understand the policy process from conception to evaluation, we will delve into current topics in the field of criminal justice reform, including: cash bail, pre-trial detention, criminal justice debt, risk assessment, abolition/amnesty, and ban-the-box efforts. The course also engages the topic of policy advocacy – or how to actually build support for a policy initiative. Thus, in addition to discussions of readings taken from social psychology, criminology, sociology, political science, and behavioral economics, we will talk with practitioners, advocates, and policymakers about the role of research and politics in the policy-making process. This course equips students to have a nuanced understanding of the political processes informing crime and punishment policy.