By Dean Sandra O. Archibald

Parrington Hall is an iconic part of the UW’s Seattle Campus.  Here are a few interesting facts about the history of this building:

  • Parrington Hall is the second oldest academic building on the UW’s Seattle campus, built in 1902 for $70,000. 
  • Built as “Science Hall,” our building was home to geology, mining, zoology, civil engineering, botany, and mechanical engineering departments.
  • The northwest wing of the building was the “State Museum” and was arranged with the geological collections on the first floor, the zoological collections on the second floor, and the botanical collections on the third floor.
  • Named posthumously for Vernon L. Parrington in 1931, a Pulitzer Prize winner in history and UW professor of English.
  • Until 1996, the exterior of the building was painted white to match neighboring Denny Hall.
  • Starting in 1937, the English Department called Parrington Hall home and remodeled the entire interior for $118,000.
  • The Evans School (then, the Graduate School of Public Affairs) moved into Parrington Hall in 1988 from their previous location in the basement of Smith Hall.  An accompanying remodel helped to adapt the building’s spaces, originally used for science lectures and as laboratories, for use by the Evans School
  • In 1996, Parrington Hall underwent comprehensive seismic upgrades and the restoration of its historic exterior.

1910 Parrington Hall with painted exterior

1910 Parrington Hall with painted exterior

1902 Dedication of Science Hall; see Denny Hall in background

1902 Dedication of Science Hall; see Denny Hall in background

1905 Zoology Lab; Today, Evans School Dean's Suite (208)

1905 Geology Lecture room; Today, Parrington 108 lecture room

1905 Botany Lab; Today, the Remak Commons (309)

1905 Botany Lab; Today, the Remak Commons (309)

1905 Geology Lecture room; Today, Parrington 108 lecture room

1905 Geology Lecture room; Today, Parrington 108 lecture room

1905 Zoological floor of State Museum; Today, second floor faculty offices

1905 Zoological floor of State Museum; Today, second floor faculty offices