Applied Research Methods and Literature Reviews

  • Emily Keller, political science and public policy librarian, is available for research and literature review consultations. She can be reached at emkeller@uw.edu or 206.685.2660.
  • Students collecting or using data about individuals (clients, employees, citizens, etc. systematically gathered via survey, interviews, observation, or administrative data) need to take special care to ensure that the individuals will suffer no ill effects from the process or from the results of the project. Human Subjects review at the University of Washington is required of some projects to ensure that those protections are in place. All students and their instructors are responsible for determining whether their projects require Human Subjects Approval.

Research Strategies

  • Excerpts from “Real World Research: A Resource for Social Scientists and Practitioner-Researchers,” Colin Robson (1993). Blackwell Publishers: Oxford, UK, and Cambridge, USA. Real World Research Robson

Literature Review

Interviewing

  • “Asking Questions: Techniques for Semistructured Interviews,” Beth L. Leech (Rutgers University). PS: Political Science & Politics (2002), 35:665–668 Cambridge University Press. Asking Questions Leech
  • “Validity and Reliability Issues in Elite Interviewing,” Jeffrey M. Berry (Tufts University). PS: Political Science & Politics (2002), 35:679-682 Cambridge University Press. Validity and Reliability Berry
  • Robert S. Weiss, Learning from Strangers: The Art and Method of Qualitative Interview Studies, (Free Press, 1994), Chapter 4: “Interviewing,” pp. 61–119. Learning from Strangers Weiss

Surveys

High Performing Teams

Each team should draft a one- to two-page team agreements memo that includes:

  1. An initial plan for organizing yourselves into a high-performing team (e.g., leadership and membership definitions and roles, mutual accountability expectations and norms, decision-rules, continuous improvement processes, conflict resolution processes); and
  2. An initial plan to do the work (e.g., coordination with client contact via primary point of contact; assigning and tracking task completion; technology platform such as GoogleDocs or other groupware resource for collecting, sharing, analyzing, and editing).

Resources on High Performing Teams

Brief Videos on High Performing Teams

Book Chapters about Working in Effective Teams

Click here for a combined PDF of the following book chapters:

  • Senge, Peter. 1990. “The Discipline of Team Learning,” in The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization. Doubleday: New York.
  • Mintrom, Michael. 2003. "Working in Teams" in People Skills in Policy Analysis. Georgetown University Press: Washington, D.C.  Part 1, pp. 118-131.
  • Mintrom, Michael. 2003. "Working in Teams" in People Skills in Policy Analysis. Georgetown University Press: Washington, D.C.  Part 2, pp. 132-141.
  • Hackman, J. Richard. 1990. “Conclusion: Creating More Effective Work Groups in Organizations,” in Groups that Work (and those that don’t). Jossey-Bass: San Francisco. Part 1, pp. 479-491.
  • Hackman, J. Richard. 1990. “Conclusion: Creating More Effective Work Groups in Organizations,” in Groups that Work (and those that don’t). Jossey-Bass: San Francisco. Part 2, pp. 492-501.

Resources for Identifying Different Work Styles Among Team Members

Resources on Managing Conflict Productively

Conflict in groups is inevitable, so it helps to develop skills to manage it in productive ways. Research shows that task-related tension, rather than interpersonal harmony, spurs team excellence.

Style Guides

Presentation Resources

Academic Integrity and Ethical Writing

Learn more about the process and forms for submitting your capstone project.