Research Topics

EPAR Technical Report #202
Publication Date: 07/23/2012
Type: Literature Review
Abstract

This brief provides a general overview of the wheat market in Bihar, in India. The first section describes trends in wheat production and consumption over the past twenty years and summarizes recent trade policy related to wheat. After a brief discussion of the types and nutritional content of wheat, the third section describes the wheat value chain in Bihar, beginning with seed development and ending with marketing. Finally, we highlight a few trends in Bihar wheat markets. We find that the quantity of wheat production in Bihar has exceeded rice production over the past four years, and that in the last two decades, wheat consumption has grown significantly among both urban and rural populations. Climate change and deteriorating land quality, however, may threaten agricultural production in Bihar in the long-term.

EPAR Technical Report #184
Publication Date: 07/11/2012
Type:
Abstract

This brief provides an overview of the national and zonal characteristics of agricultural production in Tanzania using the 2008/2009 wave of the Tanzania National Panel Survey (TZNPS), part of the Living Standards Measurement Study – Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA). More detailed information and analysis is available in the separate EPAR Tanzania LSMS-ISA Reference Report, Sections A-G.

EPAR Research Brief #187
Publication Date: 07/11/2012
Type: Data Analysis
Abstract

This brief present our analysis of maize cultivation in Tanzania using data from the 2008/2009 wave of the Tanzania National Panel Survey (TZNPS), part of the Living Standards Measurement Study – Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA). We find that Maize was the most commonly grown crop in Tanzania – cultivated by 83% of farming households. Eighty-two percent of agricultural households reported consuming maize flour during the week prior to being surveyed. About half of those households grew nearly all of the maize they consumed, making maize production an integral part of the farming household diet. A separate appendix includes details on our analyses.

EPAR Research Brief #188
Publication Date: 07/11/2012
Type: Data Analysis
Abstract

This brief presents our analysis of rice paddy cultivation in Tanzania using data from the 2008/2009 wave of the Tanzania National Panel Survey (TZNPS), part of the Living Standards Measurement Study – Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA). We find that Paddy was the sixth most commonly cultivated priority crop. Nationally, paddy was cultivated by 17% of farming households, with male- and female-headed households cultivating paddy at a similar rate.2 Cultivation rates varied widely across zones, ranging from 51% of households in Zanzibar to only 5% in the Northern Zone. A separate appendix includes additional detail on our analyses.

EPAR Research Brief #189
Publication Date: 04/09/2012
Type: Data Analysis
Abstract

This brief presents our analysis of legume cultivation in Tanzania using data from the 2008/2009 wave of the Tanzania National Panel Survey (TZNPS), part of the Living Standards Measurement Study – Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA). We find that Tanzanian farmers reported growing eight different varieties of food legumes: beans, groundnuts, cowpeas, mung beans, chickpeas, bambara nuts, field peas, soya beans, and pigeon peas. Fifty-seven percent of households in Tanzania grew at least one of these crops during the long and/or short rainy seasons.  A separate appendix includes details on our analyses.

EPAR Research Brief #190
Publication Date: 03/30/2012
Type: Data Analysis
Abstract

This brief presents a comparative analysis of men and women and of male- and female-headed households in Tanzania using data from the 2008/2009 wave of the Tanzania National Panel Survey (TZNPS), part of the Living Standards Measurement Study – Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA). We compare farm activity, productivity, input use, and sales as well as labor allocations by gender of the respondent and of the household head. In households designated “female-headed” a woman was the decision maker in the household, took part in the economy, control and welfare of the household, and was recognized by others in the household as the head. For questions regarding household labor (both non-farm and farm), the gender of the individual laborer is recorded, and we use this to illustrate the responsibilities of male and female household members. An appendix provides the details for our analyses.

EPAR Technical Report #5
Publication Date: 12/15/2008
Type: Literature Review
Abstract

As our understanding of the impacts of hidden hunger on human nutrition grows, understanding the link between fertilizer use and human nutrition becomes increasingly important. This report presents an analysis of both grey and peer-reviewed literature on the effects of fertilizer use on nutritional quality of food, particularly the staples of maize, rice, wheat, cassava and legumes. We find that some nutrient deficiencies, such as zinc, can be effectively addressed through fertilizer use while others, such as iron deficiency, are more difficult to address.  Promising breakthroughs with fortified and complete fertilizers present the opportunity to correct multiple deficiencies. Current fertilizer products exist that, when applied with the proper agronomic methods, can have a significant effect on nutrition in the developing world.  However, it is important to recognize that there are many factors in the developing world that have the potential to inhibit the benefits of fertilizer for human nutrition.  Two significant factors are poor farmers’ difficulty in procuring the correct product and the relative sophistication required to apply fertilizers at the correct amounts and time to achieve desired results.  In addition, researchers have not focused on fertilizer and nutrition studies until recently, particularly micronutrient fertilizer studies, and few studies specifically study the impacts of fertilizer on human nutrition.  More research needs to be done to understand the most effective combinations and techniques, and to understand whether these methods truly increase the amount of nutrients bioavailable to humans.