Evans School of Public Policy & Governance

Drive social change with a public policy minor

The Evans School’s Minor in Public Policy offers a relevant and exciting introduction to the field of public policy and the frameworks leaders use to address complex 21st century public challenges. Through this minor, you will learn how to use data and evidence to make sound public decisions, design effective public policy that is responsive to human behavior, and grow your leadership aptitude in order to navigate complex political and policy environments upon graduation. You will also develop your capacity to understand organizations, to lead and negotiate, and to broaden your understanding of the role of the nonprofit and social sectors in building stronger, healthier, and more just communities.

25 credits

  • PUBPOL 201 (5 credits)
  • 20 credits from 300- or 400-level PUBPOL courses or other courses approved by the Evans School
  • Minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA for all courses applied to the minor
  • Minimum 15 credits taken in residence through the UW-Seattle campus

Additional requirements from UW Undergraduate Advising webpage:

  • Any undergraduate student with at least sophomore standing (45 credits completed) who is declared in a major may declare a minor. There are no departmental admission requirements for the Public Policy Minor.
  • Only the adviser in your major department can sign off to declare a minor; this is to ensure you meet university satisfactory progress requirements.
  • Courses taken S/NS may not be counted toward a minor.

Building upon skills developed in students’ majors and other coursework, specific learning outcomes for public policy minor are:

  • Students will understand the public policy environment;
  • Students will learn how policies are crafted, adopted, implemented, and evaluated;
  • Students will learn how to preserve ethics and legitimacy and ensure fairness and equity in policy;
  • Students will develop scientifically grounded analytical skills to address public policy and governance challenges;
  • Students will develop the ability to think critically, solve problems, and make decisions in the context of public policy analysis and implementation;
  • Students will develop their ability to work collaboratively in diverse groups to develop solutions to policy challenges;
  • Students will learn to communicate and interact productively with a diverse and changing workforce and citizenry; and
  • Students will develop skills relevant to leading effectively in the public service context.

Explore Undergraduate Courses at the Evans School