Ph.D., Education, Stanford University
Parrington
225
dsuarez@uw.edu
(206) 221-1058

David Suárez, Ph.D., is an associate professor at the Evans School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Washington. His current research explores a) the relationship between management strategy and organizational performance in social sector organizations and b) the consequences of professionalization for nonprofits and foundations. He is particularly interested in collaboration, advocacy, and civic engagement—issues that link nonprofits and philanthropic institutions to public agencies and the policy process. Ongoing projects include research on: the civic life of cities – a multi-team project exploring how nonprofits contribute to the communities they serve (tinyurl.com/stanford-clc); public-nonprofit partnerships in national parks and schools; monitoring and evaluation (M&E) practices in development NGOs; and the role of foundations in generating social change.

His research has been supported by the Spencer Foundation, the Aspen Institute, the Nonprofit Academic Centers Council, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. His work has been published in the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, the American Review of Public Administration, Administration & Society, Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Voluntas, Sociology of Education, and many additional outlets. He teaches courses on public management, organizational theory, philanthropy, and leadership in the nonprofit sector. Prior to pursuing a career in academia, David worked briefly as an elementary school teacher for dual language learners in California (Spanish-English) and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Dominican Republic.

Professional Title: 
Associate Professor, Colleen Willoughby Endowed Faculty Fellow in Philanthropy & Civil Society
Specializations: 
Nonprofit Management
Public Management & Leadership
Recent Publications: 
  • David Suárez. 2020. “Advocacy, Civic Engagement, and Social Change.” Forthcoming in Walter W. Powell and Patricia Bromley, eds., The Nonprofit Sector: A Research Handbook, 3d. Ed. Yale: Yale University Press.
  • David Suárez and Hokyu Hwang. 2020. “Collaborations and Networks.” Forthcoming in Helmut Anheier and Stefan Toepler, eds., Routledge Companion to Nonprofit Management. New York: Routledge.
  • Jennifer Mosley and David Suárez. 2019. “Government-Nonprofit Relations in Evolving Cross-Sectoral Collaboration.” Introduction to Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory virtual issue, available at: academic.oup.com/jpart/pages/government_nonprofit_vi
  • Hokyu Hwang and David Suárez. 2019. “Beyond Service Provision: Advocacy and the Construction of Nonprofits as Organizational Actors.” In Hokyu Hwang, Jeannette Colyvas, and Gili Drori, eds., Agents, Actors, Actorhood: Institutional Perspectives on the Nature of Agency, Action, and Authority (Research in the Sociology of Organizations, Volume 58) (pp. 87-109). London: Emerald.
  • David Suárez, Kelly Husted, and Andreu Casas. 2018. “Community Foundations as Advocates: Social Change Discourse in the Philanthropic Sector.” Interest Groups & Advocacy 7(3): 206-232.
  • David Suárez and Nicole Esparza. 2017. “Institutional Change and Management in Public-Nonprofit Partnerships.” American Review of Public Administration 47(6):648-660.
  • Susan Garnett Russell and David Suárez. 2017. “Symbol and Substance: Human Rights Education in Historical Context,” in Monisha Bajaj, ed., Human Rights Education: Theory, Research & Praxis (pp. 19-46). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
  • David Suárez and Mary Kay Gugerty. 2016. “Funding Civil Society? Bilateral Government Support for Development NGOs.” Voluntas 27(6): 2617-2640.
  • David Suárez and Patricia Bromley. 2015. “Institutional Theories and Levels of Analysis: Diffusion, History, and Translation,” in Jurgen Schriewer, ed., World Culture Re-Contextualized (pp. 139-160). New York: Routledge.
  • David Suárez. 2015. “Creating Public Value through Collaboration: The Restoration and Preservation of Crissy Field,” in John Bryson and Barbara Crosby, eds., Creating Public Value in Practice (pp. 293-310). Boca Raton, FL: Taylor & Francis.
  • Jeff Marshall and David Suárez. 2014. “The Flow of Management Practices: An Analysis of NGO Monitoring and Evaluation Dynamics.” Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 43(6): 1033-1051.
  • David Suárez and Jeff Marshall. 2014. “Capacity in the NGO Sector: Evidence from a National Survey of Cambodia.” Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Orgs 25(1): 176-200.
  • David Suárez and Hokyu Hwang. 2013. “Resource Constraints or Cultural Conformity? Nonprofit Relationships with Businesses.” Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Orgs 24(3): 581-605. 
  • David Suárez and Patricia Bromley. 2012. “Professionalizing a Global Social Movement: Universities and Human Rights.” American Journal of Education 118, 3: 253-280.
  • David Suárez. 2012. “Grantmaking as Advocacy: The Emergence of Social Justice Philanthropy.” Nonprofit Management and Leadership 22, 3: 259-280.
  • David Suárez and Youngmi Lee. 2011. “Participation and Policy: Foundation Support for Civic Engagement and Community Organizing in the United States.” Public Management Review 13, 8: 1117-1138.
  • David Suárez. 2011. “Collaboration and Professionalization: The Contours of Public Sector Funding for Nonprofits.” Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 21, 2: 307-326.
  • David Suárez. 2010. “Street Credentials and Management Backgrounds: Careers of Nonprofit Executives in an Evolving Sector.” Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 39, 4: 696-716.
  • David Suárez, Francisco O. Ramirez, and Jeong-Woo Koo. 2009. “UNESCO and the Associated Schools Project: Symbolic Affirmation of World Community, International Understanding, and Human Rights.” Sociology of Education 82, 3: 197-216.
  • David Suárez. 2009. “Nonprofit Advocacy and Civic Engagement on the Internet.” Administration & Society 41, 3: 267-289.
  • David Suárez and Hokyu Hwang. 2008. “Civic Engagement and Nonprofit Lobbying in California.” Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 37, 1: 92-112.
  • David Suárez. 2008. “Rewriting Citizenship? Civic Education in Costa Rica and Argentina.” Comparative Education 44, 4: 485-503.
  • David Suárez. 2007. “Human Rights and Curricular Policy in Latin America and the Caribbean.” Comparative Education Review 51, 3: 329-352.
  • David Suárez. 2007. “Education Professionals and the Construction of Human Rights Education.” Comparative Education Review 51, 1: 48-70.
Professional service: 
  • Associate Editor, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory (JPART) (2019-)
  • Governing Board, Association for Research on Nonprofits and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA) (2013-2019)
  • Editorial Board, Public Administration Review (2013-2018)
Courses taught: 
  • PUBPOL 558: Collaboration and Management Across Sectors
  • PUBPOL 552: Philanthropy and Society
  • PUBPOL 550: Management of Non For Profit Organizations
  • PUBPOL 512: Managing Organizational Performance
  • PPM 504: Perspectives on Institutions